The Best Places To Buy Sneakers Online

19 November 2019
Style, Sneaker, Online Shop, Reseller
Image: Air Jordan/Courtesy of END. Clothing

GQ pulls out its credit card in search of the best places to cop across the web

As much as we love bricks and mortar stores you just can’t beat the convenience of online retailers – especially when you're looking for something that isn’t stocked in a mall.

For sneakerheads, there are a few dedicated shops that will cater to almost all your discerning needs but if you're on the hunt for something super-rare, a model only available from a particular store (or even a particular country), then it has the be purchased online.

See Also: How Sneaker Traders Turned Their Side Hustle Into A Billion Dollar Industry

So from Culture Kings right on our doorstep to cool-kid New Yorkers like Kith NYC, here are our pick of the best online sneaker retailers to spend your hard-earned dough.

USP: Dough specialises in bolder, rarer and more outlandish designs, including every iteration of Jordans and Yeezys you can imagine. As a boutique that specilalises in high-end, hard to obtain grails, the prices can vary due to demand.

But one of the best things about this site is that as a member (free email only signup) you can ask to be to notified when a particular style, size or colourway is back in stock. And it gets better. Need to source a rare sneaker in a particular size and colour and for a particular price? Ask the "shoe concierge" and he will do the digging for you.

Website: doughstore.com

USP: Culture Kings is one of the more well-known Australian retailers to have popped up to cater for the growing demand in street wear, sports apparel and sneakers. Yes, of course you can buy Nike, Puma, and Adidas model favourites in abundance but it's brands like Supra and the more recent Converse models that have us checking back into the site daily for new releases. Timberland and Vans are also available as is a select line of boots from Foundation Footwear.

USP: Lovers of the low sneaker rejoice, Prime may not specialise in ankle hugging heels but they do offer a great selection of styles to dress down a suit or dress up some drab weekend wear. Air Max 90 Ultra 2.0, Chuck Taylors, and an array of Flyknit models are available at super reasonable prices that can even undercut Platypus at times. If you like the tennis-looking geek-chic appeal of Fred Perry footwear, then they stock that too.

Website: primeonline.com.au

Up There Store

USP: Now this is an online store with a difference. Forget the Nikes of the world and opt for something a little more select. Up There Store caters for the cooler customer which might be why Melbournians dig it so much. They stock brands like Christian Kimber, Clarks Orginals, Diadora, Sempach and Victory Sportswear. Our pick? Get in on the Hener Scheme game with a pair of MIP 2 in jet black. Then throw out those old Common Projects for good.

Website: uptherestore.com

Sneakerboy

USP: The luxurious and the bling bling sit alongside the staple and the affordable. With some of the highest-priced ticket names in the business like Valentino, Saint Laurent and Prada to choose from, expect to be shredding your credit card. But why wouldn't you with Italian leather in abundance and not a cheap glue-stuck sole in sight. But never fear, even if you don't have the moolah to stretch to a pair of $990 Alexander McQueens then Sneakerboy also stock Common Projects and Axel Arigato at a more reasonable price point.

Website: sneakerboy.com

Concepts

USP: They are deemed so cool that that have their own unique lines of collaboration sneakers with a variety of brands. Yes Concepts are one hell of a website, one which sells Japanese streetwear favourites like A Bathing Ape and Visvim alongside sneaker lines from Karhu, New Balance and Reebok. With a variety of bricks and mortar stores spread across the globe (including Dubai), the brand is supported from the ground up - ensuring that the sneaker makers themselves offer Concepts first sale run on some of the most saught after limited edition releases. Keep up to date on their blog for brand news.

Website: cncpts.com

USP: With a physical store to support their minimal and almost futuristic aesthetic, Subtype have become a favourite for Sydneysiders who need a pair of sneakers quick-sharp and opt to utalise their two hour delivery service within the city. But the boutique experience extends online with brands like Filling Pieces, ETQ, MSBHV, Project A, Rains and Drôle de Monsieur supporting a strong sneaker array unlike any other in Australia.

Website: subtypestore.com

KITH

USP: Slick, sharp and simple, this stripped down site offers sneaker lovers a minimal buying experience across all your favourite brands including Puma and New Balance but it is as a stockist of uber-cool streetwear brand Fear of God that has us clicking back daily. They are currently running five colourways of the 'military sneaker'.

Website: kithnyc.com

Packer

USP: This family-run business spans three generations and is known around the world as a mecca for sports-crazy sneaker heads. Almost every niche list touting the best physical stores in the world with include Packers somewhere and for a very good reason, it stocks almost every brand you could hope to see including lesser-known names like Mitchell & Ness, Jason Markk, Native, In4mation, Huf, People and Fila.

Website: packershoes.com

USP: Largely credited with bringing sneaker and streetwear culture to the already fashion-forward city of Stockholm in the late '90s, SNS has become a deeply respected European destination for kicks, stocking almost every major release you could hope to get your hands on.

USP: With a vast range of clothing and accessories online, END stocks a broad range of sneakers including big ticket brand names like Adidas, Nike and Reebok. However if you're looking for something a little bit different they also run lines of Moncler, Valentino, Saucony and Y-3. The latter are a little more interesting and the retro-looking running brand Saucony are a particular favourite of GQ at present.


Via GQ Australia