The Emerging Menswear Designers You Need To Know About In 2020

01 January 2020
Style, Fashion, Menswear, Designer
What's next in the world of home-grown design

Renowned for producing some of Australia’s leading fashion designers, the Bachelor of Design, Fashion & Textiles program at The University of Technology Sydney showcased their emerging graduate designer collections of 2019.

Through their collections, the menswear designers questioned what values and ideals our fashion garments embody; who the world of fashion includes; who is excluded; as well as how ethics and equity are accounted for in the systems of production and consumption.

Take a look at the collections below.

Andrew Boustani

What was the idea/inspiration behind your collection?

Distorted silhouettes of a uniform informed by centuries of design language that impeded the hilled terrain of a Lebanon divided by political strongholds. People in places; distilled in archives of surveillance and capture, creating spectra of identity, significance and lineage. Totems, object value, remembrance; the return of the real.

How did you translate this into menswear?

Through conversations of collected imagery, primary and secondary sources. Menswear was the vehicle for communicating the collection’s intentions.

What are your plans for the near future?

I hope to continue my work through a Masters degree at Parsons in New York.

Danrui Yang

What was the idea/inspiration behind your collection?

My inspiration comes from my family who studied Chinese medicine since my grandpa’s father's generation. As a posterity, I have been deeply interested and influenced by this family legacy and so I want to merge Chinese medicine elements into the beauty of fashion.

How did you translate this into menswear?

My whole collection of textile focuses on printing and collage. All the prints come from my imagination of traditional Chinese medicine. All the shapes come from the patterns I imagined.

Why did you choose menswear?

I think menswear collection can let me express my ideas more abstractly. They have more space, and I can collide with myself faster.

What does the future of fashion look like to you?

Free, full of positive energy.

What are your plans for the near future?

I want to continue to study my traditional Chinese medicine art. I want to express my imagination through fashion.

Emma Byrnes

What was the idea/inspiration behind your collection?

The collection was inspired by poetic concepts of the imperfect and simple to capture the essence of an off-grid lifestyle.

How did you translate this into menswear?

I committed to the practice of repurposing. The collection is made from a combination of upcycled garments, secondhand fabric and deadstock hemp. A large portion of the collection centres around creating a new fabrication from scraps using a coiling technique. This translated into oversized, asymmetric menswear forms that embody this free spirited narrative.

Why did you choose menswear?

I find it to be a very exciting time to be an emerging menswear designer, because of the shift towards more relaxed styles from traditional tailoring. I think there is a lot of opportunity to be more experimental with form, texture and colour within a menswear context.

What does the future of fashion look like to you?

I believe the future of fashion lies in good design, intellectual clothing and advances in smart textiles.

What are your plans for the near future? 

I’m excited to continue to explore the potential for secondhand and to be apart of a sustainable fashion industry.

Patricia Julia Ibañez

What was the idea/inspiration behind your collection?

My collection is a personal exploration of the fleeting moments in a dreamlike state, where the emotions behind these experiences are manipulated and distorted to create tension in the body. I wanted to express the fragility of human life through a journey in the subconscious state, manifesting beauty in fear from wakefulness to sleep, to wakefulness.

How did you translate this into menswear?

Through a sponsorship and collaboration with ISKO Denim, my collection attempts to distort the appearance of denim into the fluidity of knitted panels that seemingly unravel and warp the body. I wanted to create the appearance of disintegration, peeling away of the body to reveal and emerge one’s most sensitive and vulnerable state.

Why did you choose menswear?

There is such a rawness that can be captured in exploring menswear form and functionality. I love men’s tailoring and the clean, structured finishes that go along with it, but having that foundation allows me to break it down to its most sensitive form and seamlessly integrate it into the fluidity of knitwear.

What are your plans for the near future?

I want to explore so much more with the possibilities of integrating knitwear into other textile mediums and imagery, to find that in-between space of creativity and business whilst staying true to my vision. As for the near future, I am completely open to whatever comes my way – masters, competitions, internships, and collaborations with other creatives.

Rebekah Murray

What was the idea/inspiration behind your collection?

My collection was a direct response to a photo album of my grandfather who migrated to Australia from Holland in the '60s. As I never got to meet him, the photo album became a direct source of surrealist inspiration. It allowed me to design for the persona I had imagined him to be; valiant and vivacious.

How did you translate this into menswear?

As a typical European man, I explored his fearlessness when it came to expressing himself through dress. The addition of florals, such as tulips responded to his Dutch heritage and his green thumb. Whilst print clashing and bold colours spoke into his own creativity and artistry, working to challenge the meek menswear we are currently witnessing in Australia.

Why did you choose menswear?

I found so much enjoyment doing menswear in 3rd year, it felt very effortless for my to engage with in comparison to womenswear. It felt wrong not to.

What does the future of fashion look like to you?

Hopefully there is a serious repeal to fast fashion and soulless fads. I think our incessant need to chase and fulfil trends is slowing down and individuals are really enjoying their true uniqueness and creative tastes.

What are your plans for the near future?

To continue celebrating the eccentricities of fashion and dress through my creative handwriting – whatever that entails.

Ying Huang

What was the idea/inspiration behind your collection?

I’m telling the story of when I was very young to where I am today – basically an exploration of childhood memories and the personal histories. All the inspiration comes from my family photographs, where my father wears loose suits and hand-woven sweaters. What I want to express is more of a journey and experience of growth.

Why did you choose menswear?

I just love menswear, but my father was also a great influence. In traditional Chinese families, your father is like God, teaching us how to love, how to share, and how to be a good person.

What does the future of fashion look like to you?

The future of fashion will continue to explore how traditional techniques done by hand can stay relevant.

What are your plans for the near future?

I want to go to the UK to study postgraduate, and then start my own business about suit tailoring.

Elaine Mao

What was the idea/inspiration behind your collection?

My inspiration comes from the love and awe of the nature and colours. When I was young, I started to paint mountains and rivers, and aimed to find my true self from the natural scenes. For this collection, my collections are coming from the paintings that I created through my spare time.

How did you translate this into menswear?

I created my own paintings on canvas, scanned them and worked on them in Photoshop and Illustrator, then put them on to fabrics directly.

Why did you choose menswear?

I choose menswear is because I love tailoring garments very much - I love the cut and shape. Also, I love to make pattern making and change the patterns in my own styles. I want to combine both my painting skills and tailoring skills to make this collection.

What does the future of fashion look like to you?

I am going to keep improving my painting and tailoring skills to make more interesting menswear. Also, I want my menswear to be a bit poetic, that’s the main direction for me to keep doing menswear.

What are your plans for the near future?

I am planning to go back to Shanghai China. I want to open the Chinese fashion market to the world through different directions and aspects.


Via GQ Australia